School adopts policy to curtail Facebook and other media posts - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

School adopts policy to curtail Facebook and other media posts

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By Debra Bogstie, NBC Connecticut.com

CONNECTICUT- One Connecticut High School is adopting a tough policy for school employees when it comes to social media like Facebook. 

From Twitter to Facebook and beyond, workers in the West Hartford School District are being formally warned to watch what they write. The school board just adopted a new policy aimed at cracking down on employees who post questionable material online material that parents and students can see.

"I do agree with it. I work for a large company, and I feel as though as adults we need to be appropriate online as well as anywhere we go," said West Hartford resident, Laura Busey.

The policy does not specify punishments, but does call anything posted online that interferes with the educational process unacceptable.

"I think teachers have to be responsible for how they're interacting with the students and not go over the line," Judy McGowan, West Hartford resident added.

The school board first considered the policy in June, and then revised it, passing it earlier this week. It comes after an embarrassing case in Windsor Locks where Facebook postings by Superintendent David Telesca have parents upset and Telesca facing disciplinary action. In West Hartford, high school students have mixed opinions on the policy that affects teachers, administrators and staff in schools throughout the district.

"You're not going to be able to learn because you won't take them seriously, so I think it's a good policy and it should be enforced," student, Virginia Nunez stated.

"I don't think it's needed. I mean, if you're going to go digging around someone's Facebook page you shouldn't be so shocked about what you find. I mean, it's their information. It was their choice to put it up there," student, Harrison Feinstein added.

"I think it is good because Facebook can sometimes get out of control," student Kahari Belcher said.

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