Your heart. What's love got to do with it? - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

Your heart. What's love got to do with it?

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JACKSON, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

If you are planning a night of romance for your sweetie, it may turn into something more intimate. And doctors say that's a good thing, because sex can do wonders for your heart.

"The more frequently you have sexual activity, the healthier is your immune system, which will put you at lower risk for infection and inflammation. Both of those have been tied to the development of vascular disease," said Virginia cardiologist, Dr. Warren Levy. 

That's because sexual activity opens up the blood vessels, and being in a good relationship makes it even better.

A comprehensive review of divorce statistics by the University of Arizona showed that divorced people are at 23% greater risk of early death than married people. So its important to work on bonding.

"It can provide a release of emotions, whether it's a sexual activity or a shared activity. It helps decrease feelings of loneliness and loneliness can lead to depression and anxiety. And it cuts down on stress," said psychologist, Dr. Gregory Jones.

Dr. Jones recommends the following tips for keeping the romance alive.

Be an active listener. "Turn off the TV. Put the remote down. Close the computer. Put away the iPad. Maintain eye contact and focus on actually listening to each other," Dr. Jones said.

Focus on the positives in your relationship stop nagging. Make time for your partner and touch more often. Because your heart can always use a little love.

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