E-15 fuel debate over long term effect on car - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

E-15 fuel debate over long term effect on car

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The oil industry and some food groups, however, oppose the increased use of corn ethanol for fuel, and warn of damage if E-15 is used improperly. The oil industry and some food groups, however, oppose the increased use of corn ethanol for fuel, and warn of damage if E-15 is used improperly.

NEW YORK, NY (NBC) - There's a new kind of gasoline being developed that might save the earth and save consumers money at the pump. However there is a debate surrounding this E-15 fuel.

Most gasoline in the United States contains 10% ethanol. Increased biofuel production has prompted the creation of E-15, a blend of 15% ethanol and 85% gasoline that will soon be more widely available.

"The statistical testing that occurred, 86 cars over 186,000 miles each, is the most rigorous testing of a fuel in the history of the US," explains Adam Monroe, President of Novozymes North America.

Nascar drivers like Kurt Busch have promoted the efficiency of biofuels.

The Environmental Protection Agency says E-15 is safe for cars and light trucks 2001 and newer. It is not for motorcycles, buses, boats or snowmobiles.

The oil industry and some food groups, however, oppose the increased use of corn ethanol for fuel, and warn of damage if E-15 is used improperly.

"The whole E-15 debate is whether or not over time introducing the availability of that fuel widely to a widely disparate type of engine is going to have a corrosive and damaging effect on the engine itself the research has really not been completed in that regard," warns Patrick Boyle, CEO American Meat Institute.

"Nascar right now has run two or three million miles under some very extreme conditions and loved the fuel. So, I really think there's no basis to that argument other than they are trying to scare the consumer out of buying a better product," predicts Walter Wendland, CEO Golden Grain Energy. 

Gas stations will be required to post notices wherever E-15 is sold, so consumers can decide whether it's the right fuel for them.

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