Foods most likely to choke children - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

Foods most likely to choke children

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Researchers looked at thousands of children who had emergency room visits because of non-fatal, food related choking between 2001 to 2009. Researchers looked at thousands of children who had emergency room visits because of non-fatal, food related choking between 2001 to 2009.
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JACKSON, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

A new study in the journal Pediatrics finds the number of little ones who are treated for choking on certain foods is still high.

"We have done a great job in this country preventing choking in children on toys. Back since the 1990s, we've had laws and regulations. We have no such systems in place currently for food," said Dr. Gary Smith with Nationwide Children's Hospital.

Researchers looked at thousands of children who had emergency room visits because of non-fatal, food related choking between 2001 to 2009. The authors found that an average of more than 12,000 children under the age of 15 were treated for food-related choking each year. That's about 34 children every day.

Items that caused the most problems were:

  • Hard candy 16%
  • Other candy 13%
  • Bones 12%
  • Meats 12%

Hot dogs were not included under meats. They have their own category because they caused almost three percent of the food-related choking cases.

"The hot dog is the perfect size to block the airways in a young child, so that's why those are much more dangerous foods to give to a child," Dr. Smith said.

Study authors recommend placing warning labels on foods that pose a high choking risk and developing public awareness campaigns to educate everyone about the danger of food-related choking.

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