Walt's Look Around: Summer Vacation - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

Walt's Look Around: Summer Vacation

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we all faithfully stood by and could almost set our watches by the next predictable eruption of the most famous geyser in the world, Old Faithful, once again reminding us of the wonder of the planet we live on. we all faithfully stood by and could almost set our watches by the next predictable eruption of the most famous geyser in the world, Old Faithful, once again reminding us of the wonder of the planet we live on.
The trees have grown to the point that the snake river isn't as exposed today as it was 50 years ago when Adams set up here and got his famous shot. The trees have grown to the point that the snake river isn't as exposed today as it was 50 years ago when Adams set up here and got his famous shot.
The hummingbirds were migrating south. The hummingbirds were migrating south.

There is nothing like a summer vacation that takes you to where it feels like winter. And our band of almost 40 travelers from Mississippi's first stop after getting off of Amtrak's Empire Builder was Glacier National Park, Montana.

A cold front was just passing and the fire in the fireplace at the lodge wasn't just for decorations. Glacier Park does have some active glaciers. We didn't get to see very many of them because of the cloud cover that day.

But the purpose of the park isn't to show off glaciers, which they may have NONE of in a few decades, but to show off the kinds of topography that glaciers leave behind: deep valleys, and waterfalls from the summer melt of the ice fields several more thousand feet up the mountain sides, and those blue water streams that seem to be in an awful hurry to get somewhere.  

Well, from the land of ice to the land of steam, our next stop was not only the first National Park in the nation, but the first National Park ever established in the world, Yellowstone.

It's eerie landscape of bubbling mud pots and steaming multicolored ponds and geysers is very unearth-like. But then again it isn't. Because in this one spot on the planet, what is going on in the very middle of the earth is as close to the surface as it gets.

An immense hot spot of magma is seething angrily just a few miles below your feet at Yellowstone. But its anger is tempered and turns to beauty and wonder as the byproducts of it bubble to the surface. And we all faithfully stood by and could almost set our watches by the next predictable eruption of the most famous geyser in the world, Old Faithful, once again reminding us of the wonder of the planet we live on.  

Our last stop on our tour was a place I have wanted to see ever since I picked up a book of Ansel Adams photographs and saw his shot of the Grand Tetons taken from this very spot at the Snake River Overlook just outside Jackson Hole Wyoming.

The trees have grown to the point that the snake river isn't as exposed today as it was 50 years ago when Adams set up here and got his famous shot. But what an impressive mountain range. Shooting upwards to over 13 thousand feet, straight out of the valley floor.  

The Chapel of the Transfiguration is a small Episcopal Church that stays open all of the time for tourists like us to come inside and sit in a pew and sing a hymn and say a prayer and look out the window behind the pulpit at the wondrous view.  

We stopped at Bear Lake in northern Utah on our way to Salt Lake City and our flight home. The hummingbirds were migrating south. Just like us, heading back home in the Southland after another wondrous summer vacation, drawing to an end.

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