Canadian teen finds help at St. Jude - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

Canadian teen finds help at St. Jude

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JACKSON, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

A year ago, 16 year old Angie Lee was facing a death sentence in her home country of Canada.

Suffering a relapse of cancer, the teenager needed a bone marrow transplant from a donor. "Back from where I'm from, they couldn't find a match, so my dad started calling around and found that St Jude might be able to make a bone marrow match. We came here and with their different technologies and everything, they found us a bone marrow donor," Angie said.

Angie's mom, Sandie said her family is blessed. "Just coming to St Jude was a blessing and we're happy to be here and so grateful. It's the best hospital. So, if you do have to have this happen to you, at least there's a place like St Jude."

Sandie has stayed on the campus of St. Jude with Angie for months. "They were able to find us a match, where there was no match. I just believe through the expertise of the doctors they knew it didn't have to be a perfect match. We can work with the donors that we have and it should be successful and it was. Without them, we'd still be doing chemotherapy and waiting for it to come back," Sandie said.

Instead, the Lee family has found hope. "I'm just slowly lowering my medicine and stuff to make sure it doesn't come back, so my new bone marrow cells will be settled in my body and my body will accept them."

"They saved our life, this hospital did. There's no doubt about it," Sandie said.

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