Voluma is facelift without the surgery - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

Voluma is facelift without the surgery

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JACKSON, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

It is considered a facelift without the knife, and it has just been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States. It is called Voluma.

"Instead of dissolving away, it still stays as a putty," said Plastic Surgeon, Dr. Adair Blackledge. He says Voluma is thicker than other injectable fillers, and it is injected deeply into the face.

"Our target is right in here, to build this cheek up." Dr. Blackledge calls the procedure the perfect alternative to surgery. And it's the perfect choice for Linda Valle. Dr. Blackledge demonstrates how he decides where to inject the filler. "Do you see how the corner of her mouth is turning down just a little bit?"

Voluma is currently the longest lasting filler on the market, with results lasting up to two years. "The reason this is going to be so popular is because this is not only the first filler that's come out that gives you fullness, it actually lifts at the same time," Dr. Blackledge said. "As long as you don't over-do it, people are going to look natural. People in the South want natural results. They want a natural looking appearance. I tell people all the time, if people can't tell what you're doing, then we're doing our job."

The procedure looks painful, but Linda never flinched while getting the injections. "That was painless. It was absolutely painless," she said.

Actually Dr. Blackledge says the product is designed to be painless. "The great thing about the new injectables is the numbing medicine is built into them so as you inject, it actually numbs."

And the down time? Absolutely zero. "The majority of our patients go right back to work. So she'll be able to go right back to work, or do household stuff, kids stuff, whatever she has on her schedule."

The cost of the procedure is about $600. 

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