Walt's Look Around: Holiday Traditions - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

Walt's Look Around: Holiday Traditions

It is a very busy time of the year. There is usually so much going on it's hard to get anything done. But there are plenty of chances for you to see decorations and live nativities and the like if you have the time.

Just to show you how fast away the old year passes, they've already had the Belhaven Singing Christmas Tree for this year. That was last weekend.

It is one of those proverbial Mississippi Christmas traditions, in its eighth decade  now, that you need to go see  sometime.

But lights stay up for a while, like the huge display in the water park at Tylertown. I don't even know if they know how many thousands or hundreds of thousands of lights there are in the park. They start setting all of this up in September, though, to have it ready to light up between Thanksgiving and New Years.

And just as ambitious as lighting displays have become, so have live nativity celebrations. Johnston Chapel United Methodist in Summit usually has a pretty good one.

Lakeshore United Methodist in Byram is having theirs this weekend with live animals. But probably Shiloh Methodist in Pelahatchie takes the cake in extraordinary live nativities, though.

Add to that the Judean Village portrayed is set on the porches of the cabins in the church's ancient campground just adds that much more to the pretend trip back to the world of the first Christmas.

Lakeshore and Shiloh's live drive through nativities are going on tonight and Saturday night.

I don't know if kids get electric trains for Christmas anymore. It was a big thing back when I was a youngster. But no more than I roast chestnuts on an open fire but like to sing songs about it, I like to see an ambitious train display.

Here's the one at the Winter Archives and History building in Jackson. This is the one they used to set up in the Old Capitol every year.

But with Katrina damaging that building so, and the resultant restoration taking it all the way back to the way it looked when it was built prior to the civil war, an electric train set there would be just a little out of place. But it would be an empty season not to have it at all.

And that's what the celebration of Christmas is as much as it is anything, a performance of a set pattern of appropriate celebrations, just like the ones we used to know, whether we actually knew them or not.

Helps to keep civilization from flying off into outer space when we have to re-anchor ourselves to traditions just before the year's end every year.

But it sure is a busy time of year, all of this going on. But I guess ‘busy' is a part of the tradition, too.

Copyright 2013 MSNewsNow. All rights reserved.

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