We Don't Need Your Love: We Just Want Your Wheels - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

We Don't Need Your Love: We Just Want Your Wheels

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SOURCE National Kidney Foundation

NEW YORK, Feb. 13, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- This Valentine's Day, hold the roses and chocolate. Show your true feelings by donating your used car to the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Cars Program. Eighty percent of the funds raised will help support life-saving programs and services. While your heartfelt gift won't get you a romantic card in return, it might actually get you something more useful -- a tax deduction.

The National Kidney Foundation says this gift is hassle-free. No fancy poetry, gift wrapping or frantic phone calls to the florist. The donation process is simple. All you need to do is visit kidneycars.org or call 1-800-488-CARS (2277) and the National Kidney Foundation will handle all of the details, including arranging a free vehicle pick-up.

Kidney Disease Facts:

  • Kidney disease kills more people each year than breast and prostate cancer combined.
  • One in three American adults is at risk for kidney disease.
  • Major risk factors for kidney disease include: high blood pressure, diabetes and a family history of kidney failure.
  • More than 26 million Americans - one in nine adults – have chronic kidney disease and most don't know it.
  • More than 99,000 Americans are currently on the national waiting list for a life-saving kidney transplant. Fourteen will die each day while waiting.

The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is the leading organization in the U.S. dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease for hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals, millions of patients and their families and tens of millions of Americans at risk.

For more information, visit www.kidney.org. To donate your car, van, truck, motorcycle or boat, visit www.kidneycars.org or call 1-800-488-CARS (2277).

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