Highway safety study gives MS bad grade - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

Highway safety study gives MS bad grade

This study, conducted by Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, ranks Mississippi among the nine worst states when it comes to highway safety laws that prevent wrecks. Source: WLBT This study, conducted by Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, ranks Mississippi among the nine worst states when it comes to highway safety laws that prevent wrecks. Source: WLBT
House Transportation Committee Chair Representative Robert Johnson, says he's working to help push through several bills this session that deal with improving highway safety, limiting the use of cell phones behind the wheel. Source: WLBT House Transportation Committee Chair Representative Robert Johnson, says he's working to help push through several bills this session that deal with improving highway safety, limiting the use of cell phones behind the wheel. Source: WLBT
Currently Mississippi's driving and texting laws only apply to teens, but that could change. Source: WLBT Currently Mississippi's driving and texting laws only apply to teens, but that could change. Source: WLBT
JACKSON, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

A national highway safety advocacy group is giving Mississippi a bad grade in a recent report.

They say we're lacking the right laws to keep motorist safe. Now state lawmakers are working to change all that.

This study, conducted by Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, ranks Mississippi among the nine worst states when it comes to highway safety laws that prevent wrecks.

They say without the right laws, 'lethal loopholes' exist, which can lead to preventable deaths.

House Transportation Committee Chair Representative Robert Johnson, says he's working to help push through several bills this session that deal with improving highway safety, limiting the use of cell phones behind the wheel.  

"Because its distracted driving, which is as dangerous as a DUI or more so, and causes more accidents. The truth of the matter is if you're dialing a number on the phone that's the same kind of distraction we need to do something to make our roads safe," said Johnson.

Currently Mississippi's driving and texting laws only apply to teens, but that could change.

Johnson says, "If the bill we think has the best chance of passing passes, you can answer a call, talk on the phone but you cannot text." 

Safe driving advocates say it only takes a split second of distracted driving to wind up in an accident and that everyone would be much safer if drivers just put their phone down altogether.

Johnson says, "Texting and driving is a big problem in Mississippi, but we also have roads that are in bad shape. You need all the attention in the world you can devote to driving because of the condition of our roads."

According to local law enforcement, passing a no texting law is easier than enforcing one.

They say it's often difficult to prove someone was texting when they pull someone over.

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