Precautions put in place as flood waters rise - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

Precautions put in place as flood waters rise

Animals are searching for dry land as flood water rises in Vicksburg. Source: WLBT Animals are searching for dry land as flood water rises in Vicksburg. Source: WLBT
Animals are searching for dry land as flood water rises in Vicksburg. Source: WLBT Animals are searching for dry land as flood water rises in Vicksburg. Source: WLBT
Animals are searching for dry land as flood water rises in Vicksburg. Source: WLBT Animals are searching for dry land as flood water rises in Vicksburg. Source: WLBT
Animals are searching for dry land as flood water rises in Vicksburg. Source: WLBT Animals are searching for dry land as flood water rises in Vicksburg. Source: WLBT
Flood waters continue to rise in Vicksburg. Source: WLBT Flood waters continue to rise in Vicksburg. Source: WLBT
JACKSON, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

Over the next five days, the Mississippi River is expected to rise seven feet above the flood stage, putting some homes and animals at risk.

Recreational communities like Eagle Lake are facing some tighter restrictions as the river continues to rise.

The Mississippi Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is telling boaters to stay out if they don't live in the area. They say if homeowners need to check on their properties, they should do so without causing a wake. 

"It may be six inches or two inches from going in to the actual dwelling -- so the dwelling itself may not be flooded at this moment -- but when somebody comes by at a high rate of speed and they put a one to two foot wake, then at that point the water is going to go into the home or business and cause some damage," said Captain Chris Reed.

The Department wants to remind drivers in the flood zones to be careful because wildlife and livestock are on the move attempting to get to dry land.

They say there's no need to try to rescue or mess with the animals and that law enforcement agencies will be increasing their patrols to ensure property and animals aren't being harmed.

"People may see them now on the levees," Captain Reed said. "They may have some concerns, but that's perfectly normal for those animals and they've survived this way for all these years."

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