Hinds County Sheriff Victor Mason urges men to get their annual - MSNewsNow.com - Jackson, MS

Hinds County Sheriff Victor Mason urges men to get their annual prostate exams

A metro-area sheriff is encouraging men to put their pride aside and get a life-saving examination. Source: WLBT A metro-area sheriff is encouraging men to put their pride aside and get a life-saving examination. Source: WLBT
A metro-area sheriff is encouraging men to put their pride aside and get a life-saving examination. Source: WLBT A metro-area sheriff is encouraging men to put their pride aside and get a life-saving examination. Source: WLBT
A metro-area sheriff is encouraging men to put their pride aside and get a life-saving examination. Source: WLBT A metro-area sheriff is encouraging men to put their pride aside and get a life-saving examination. Source: WLBT
A metro-area sheriff is encouraging men to put their pride aside and get a life-saving examination. Source: WLBT A metro-area sheriff is encouraging men to put their pride aside and get a life-saving examination. Source: WLBT
A metro-area sheriff is encouraging men to put their pride aside and get a life-saving examination. Source: WLBT A metro-area sheriff is encouraging men to put their pride aside and get a life-saving examination. Source: WLBT
HINDS COUNTY, MS (Mississippi News Now) -

A metro-area sheriff is encouraging men to put their pride aside and get a life-saving examination.

After being diagnosed with prostate cancer earlier this year, Hinds County Sheriff Victor Mason is back at work, encouraging men within his department to get prostate exams.

READ MORE: Hinds Co. sheriff back at work after cancer diagnosis

He hopes to not only talk to men within his department, he’s on a campaign to reach other men in the metro-area and encourage them to do the same.

As he waits to learn if he is cancer-free, Mason shared his journey, beginning with when he first started to notice a change in his body last summer.

Mason said he began to experience frequent urination, but he correlated it to his consumption of water, soda and other beverages, and dismissed the symptom.

Towards the end of 2017, Mason said he began to notice the frequent urination became worse and began to disrupt his sleeping pattern.

“30-45 minutes of every hour, every night, I was going to the bathroom and it was painful,” Mason said. “Even then when I would finish, I would still have dribbles if you will, but I ignored it.”

At the start of 2017, Mason said his symptoms of painful urination and increased trips to the restroom began to increase and it got to a point where it was affecting his work flow because he had to urinate every 15-20 minutes.

“Towards the end of January, I started to get weak,” Mason said. “I started to sleep a lot. Even on my off days, I was on the couch. Finally, my wife and I started going to the doctor and it seemed as though they couldn’t find out what was going on because at that point, I couldn’t hold anything on my stomach. When you get to the point you can’t hold Gatorade or Pedialyte, something is wrong and my body was trying to talk to me then. Even when I would try to eat, that wouldn’t stay in my stomach but for 10 seconds. It would come right back out.”

Mason said he continued to lose strength and lose weight into February 2017.

After several tests and no confirmation of what was making Mason ill, Mason visited a doctor who asked to perform a prostate exam on him.

Just one week later, Mason and his family received news they were not expecting to hear.

“I think the most horrifying words were when he looked at me and said 'Mr. Mason, you have prostate cancer',” Mason said. “I tell everybody a white screen just came over my face, I was blind, and I didn’t know what to do or what to say.”

The doctor went on to collect samples of Mason’s prostate and the following week, Mason said the doctor told him he needed to be admitted to a hospital.

“I was in the hospital 14 days and half of those days I was in the ICU,” Mason said. “It was tough. I was being fed through everything, so I’m just grateful to be here. I lost 14 pounds, but my appetite is like a wild horse right now!”

While he was being treated, Mason said he went through 8 weeks of daily radiation.

“I’ve never been sick a day in my life, other than allergies and things like that,” Mason said. “It was funny when the nurse asked me who’s your primary physician? I don’t have one because I don’t get sick.”

When people get a cancer diagnosis, Mason said people tend to think their lives are over, but he said that’s not always the case, thanks to modern technology.

He shared a recent conversation he had with one of the men within his department and said he urged him to get his prostate exam the next day.

Mason said the man visited with him last week and shared he was diagnosed with stage 2 prostate cancer.

“Most men that haven’t been through it will tell you well, I don’t want to go through that finger,” Mason said. “I know I’ve missed about 2-3 because I said I just don’t have time, I’ll do it tomorrow but guess what? Tomorrow never gets here.”

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